© 2020 Pocket Outdoor Media Inc. All Rights Reserved. It might seem like your teacher is speaking in a language you’ve never heard – in fact, the language of yoga is Sanskrit, which is the root of many Indian languages one of the oldest human languages of all. Buddhi (“she who is conscious, awake”): the higher mind, which is the seat of wisdom (vidya, jnana); cf. Yama is the first of the eight limbs of yoga outlined in the yoga sutras. Roots of Asana Names, Sanskrit, Word Roots, Yoga, London Yoga, Yoga London ON, Yoga Instruction, RYT 200, RYT 500, Yoga Teacher Training,Postures,Meditation Yoga through Sanskrit योग yoga-s, which means "yoke, union". bhakti–love, devotion. To some yoga enthusiasts, this peculiar new language adds a certain charm to the ancient and mysterious practice of yoga. Start studying Yoga Sanskrit Root. Otherwise, it can seem like a bunch of giberish that you may or may not start to recognize in class. Bakasana - Elbow balancing pose. Sources: light on Yoga by B.K.S. Yantra is the Sanskrit word for a mystical diagram, particularly diagrams from the Tantric traditions of the Indian religions. If you’re new to yoga (or even if you’re not), you may have heard words in class that you don’t recognise. I can’t teach you about Sanskrit in one blog post, but I can provide loose translations for the most common Sanskrit words used in yoga. The meaning of the word Yoga is “union”. Mention Sanskrit in yoga teacher training and the students freak out a bit. I’m Katia and I love to do yoga and blog. brahman, Avadhuta (“he who has shed [everything]”): a radical type of renouncer (samnyasin) who often engages in unconventional behavior, Avidya (“ignorance”): the root cause of suffering (duhkha); also called ajnana; cf. Search the Sanskrit Roots: Start to type any of the Sanskrit Roots or their definitions for example “ram” as a root or “run” as a definition. yoni, Mahabharata (“Great Bharata”): one of India’s two great ancient epics telling of the great war between the Pandavas and the Kauravas and serving as a repository for many spiritual and moral teachings, Mahatma (from maha-atman, “great self”): an honorific title (meaning something like “a great soul”) bestowed on particularly meritorious individuals, such as Gandhi, Maithuna (“twinning”): the Tantric sexual ritual in which the participants view each other as Shiva and Shakti respectively, Manas (“mind”): the lower mind, which is bound to the senses and yields information (vijnana) rather than wisdom (jnana, vidya); cf. See also The word brahmanrefers to the Supreme Principle regarded as … #51 Yoga . Abhasa: Reflection, appearance, semblance, not true. Yogi through Hindi योगी yogi from Sanskrit योगिन् yogin, one who practices yoga or ascetic. As per Yogic scriptures the practice of Yoga leads to the union of individual consciousness with that of the Universal Consciousness, indicating a perfect harmony between the mind and body, Man & Nature. This union is not referring to your fingers touching your toes or your nose reaching your knees. asmita; see also buddhi, manas, Ahimsa (“nonharming”): the single most important moral discipline (yama), Akasha (“ether/space”): the first of the five material elements of which the physical universe is composed; also used to designate “inner” space, that is, the space of consciousness (called cid-akasha), Amrita (“immortal/immortality”): a designation of the deathless Spirit (atman, purusha); also the nectar of immortality that oozes from the psychoenergetic center at the crown of the head (see sahasrara-cakra) when it is activated and transforms the body into a “divine body” (divya-deha), Ananda (“bliss”): the condition of utter joy, which is an essential quality of the ultimate Reality (tattva), Anga (“limb”): a fundamental category of the yogic path, such as asana, dharana, dhyana, niyama, pranayama, pratyahara, samadhi, yama; also the body (deha, sharira), Arjuna (“White”): one of the five Pandava princes who fought in the great war depicted in the Mahabharata, disciple of the God-man Krishna whose teachings can be found in the Bhagavad Gita, Asana (“seat”): a physical posture (see also anga, mudra); the third limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eightfold path (astha-anga-yoga); originally this meant only meditation posture, but subsequently, in hatha yoga, this aspect of the yogic path was greatly developed, Ashrama (“that where effort is made”): a hermitage; also a stage of life, such as brahmacharya, householder, forest dweller, and complete renouncer (samnyasin), Ashta-anga-yoga, ashtanga-yoga (“eight-limbed union”): the eightfold yoga of Patanjali, consisting of moral discipline (yama), self-restraint (niyama), posture (asana), breath control (pranayama), sensory inhibition (pratyahara), concentration (dharana), meditation (dhyana), and ecstasy (samadhi), leading to liberation (kaivalya), Read The Bhagavad Gita: The Song of God Retold in Simplified English, Asmita (“I-am-ness”): a concept of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, roughly synonymous with ahamkara, Atman (“self”): the transcendental Self, or Spirit, which is eternal and superconscious; our true nature or identity; sometimes a distinction is made between the atman as the individual self and the parama-atman as the transcendental Self; see also purusha; cf. Abhasamatra: In name only. atman, purusha), Brahmana: a brahmin, a member of the highest social class of traditional Indian society; also an early type of ritual text explicating the rituals and mythology of the four Vedas; cf. Baddha - Bound, caught, restrained, firm. Z Zen through Japanese 禅 and Chinese 禪 Chán ultimately from Pali झन jhāna and Sanskrit ध्यान dhyana, which means "a meditation". The most important thing, however, is that Yoga - with its entire applications and implications - is a powerful means to an end. granthi, Matsyendra (“Lord of Fish”): an early Tantric master who founded the Yogini-Kaula school and is remembered as a teacher of Goraksha, Maya (“she who measures”): the deluding or illusive power of the world; illusion by which the world is seen as separate from the ultimate singular Reality (atman), Moksha (“release”): the condition of freedom from ignorance (avidya) and the binding effect of karma; also called mukti, kaivalya, Mudra (“seal”): a hand gesture (such as cin-mudra) or whole-body gesture (such as viparita-karani-mudra); also a designation of the feminine partner in the Tantric sexual ritual, Nada (“sound”): the inner sound, as it can be heard through the practice of nada yoga or kundalini yoga, Nada-Yoga (“Yoga of the [inner] sound”): the yoga or process of producing and intently listening to the inner sound as a means of concentration and ecstatic self-transcendence, Nadi (“conduit”): one of 72,000 or more subtle channels along or through which the life force (prana) circulates, of which the three most important ones are the ida-nadi, pingala-nadi, and sushumna-nadi, Nadi-shodhana (“channel cleansing”): the practice of purifying the conduits, especially by means of breath control (pranayama), Narada: a great sage associated with music, who taught bhakti yoga and is attributed with the authorship of one of two Bhakti-Sutras, Natha (“lord”): appellation of many North Indian masters of yoga, in particular adepts of the Kanphata (“Split-ear”) school allegedly founded by Goraksha, Neti-neti (“not thus, not thus”): an Upanishadic expression meant to convey that the ultimate Reality is neither this nor that, that is, is beyond all description, Nirodha (“restriction”): in Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, the very basis of the process of concentration, meditation, and ecstasy; in the first instance, the restriction of the “whirls of the mind” (citta-vritti), Niyama (“[self-]restraint”): the second limb of Patanjali’s eightfold path, which consists of purity (saucha), contentment (samtosha), austerity (tapas), study (svadhyaya), and dedication to the Lord (ishvara-pranidhana), Nyasa (“placing”): the Tantric practice of infusing various body parts with life force (prana) by touching or thinking of the respective physical area, Ojas (“vitality”): the subtle energy produced through practice, especially the discipline of chastity (brahmacharya), Om: the original mantra symbolizing the ultimate Reality, which is prefixed to many mantric utterances, Parama-atman or paramatman (“supreme self”): the transcendental Self, which is singular, as opposed to the individuated self (jiva-atman) that exists in countless numbers in the form of living beings, Parama-hamsa, paramahansa (“supreme swan”): an honorific title given to great adepts, such as Ramakrishna and Yogananda, See alsoWhy Paramahansa Yogananda Was a Man Before His Time. It is the merging of the individual will … As I’ve gotten more into teaching yoga, knowing the sanskrit names has really helped my understanding of the poses and what the focus of the shape is. Sanskrit Words, Asana Names, Mantras and Devotional Songs related to Yoga. The word yoga comes from the Sanskrit root word “yug,” which literally means to yoke or unite. vairagya, Samnyasin (“he who has cast off”): a renouncer, Samsara (“confluence”): the finite world of change, as opposed to the ultimate Reality (brahman or nirvana), Samskara (“activator”): the subconscious impression left behind by each act of volition, which, in turn, leads to renewed psychomental activity; the countless samskaras hidden in the depth of the mind are ultimately eliminated only in asamprajnata-samadhi (see samadhi), Samyama (“constraint”): the combined practice of concentration (dharana), meditation (dhyana), and ecstasy (samadhi) in regard to the same object, Sat (“being/reality/truth”): the ultimate Reality (atman or brahman), Sat-sanga (“true company/company of Truth”): the practice of frequenting the good company of saints, sages, Self-realized adepts, and their disciples, in whose company the ultimate Reality can be felt more palpably, Satya (“truth/truthfulness”): truth, a designation of the ultimate Reality; also the practice of truthfulness, which is an aspect of moral discipline (yama), Shakti (“power”): the ultimate Reality in its feminine aspect, or the power pole of the Divine; see also kundalini-shakti, Shakti-pata (“descent of power”): the process of initiation, or spiritual baptism, by means of the benign transmission of an advanced or even enlightened adept (siddha), which awakens the shakti within a disciple, thereby initiating or enhancing the process of liberation, Shankara (“He who is benevolent”): the eighth-century adept who was the greatest proponent of nondualism (Advaita Vedanta) and whose philosophical school was probably responsible for the decline of Buddhism in India, Shishya (“student/disciple”): the initiated disciple of a guru, Shiva (“He who is benign”): the Divine; a deity that has served yogins as an archetypal model throughout the ages, Shiva-Sutra (“Shiva’s Aphorisms”): like the Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, a classical work on yoga, as taught in the Shaivism of Kashmir; authored by Vasugupta (ninth century C.E. Your Guide to Common Sanskrit Words Used In Yoga. Sanskrit language is around 3500 years old. Ahimsa — Non-harm.. Ananda — Bliss, joy, our true nature.. Amma/Ma — Mother/ Devine Mother.. Avatar — An embodiment or incarnation of the devine (you, me, us!).. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Directional sanskrit words, sanskrit numbers, sanskrit body parts, ... 70+ Sanskrit words you need to know for your yoga practice. Yuj is a Sanskrit root word which means “to yoke,” “to unite,” “to add” or “to join. ida-nadi, Prajna (“wisdom”): the opposite of spiritual ignorance (ajnana, avidya); one of two means of liberation in Buddhist yoga, the other being skillful means (upaya), i.e., compassion (karuna), Prakriti (“creatrix”): nature, which is multilevel and, according to Patanjali’s yoga-darshana, consists of an eternal dimension (called pradhana or “foundation”), levels of subtle existence (called sukshma-parvan), and the physical or coarse realm (called sthula-parvan); all of nature is deemed unconscious (acit), and therefore it is viewed as being in opposition to the transcendental Self or Spirit (purusha), Prakriti-laya (“merging into Nature”): a high-level state of existence that falls short of actual liberation (kaivalya); the being who has attained that state, Prana (“life/breath”): life in general; the life force sustaining the body; the breath as an external manifestation of the subtle life force, Pranayama (from prana and ayama, “life/breath extension”): breath control, the fourth limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eigthfold path, consisting of conscious inhalation (puraka) retention (kumbhaka) and exhalation (recaka); at an advanced state, breath retention occurs spontaneously for longer periods of time, Prasada (“grace/clarity”): divine grace; mental clarity, Pratyahara (“withdrawal”): sensory inhibition, the fifth limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eightfold path, Puja (“worship”): ritual worship, which is an important aspect of many forms of yoga, notably bhakti yoga and Tantra, Puraka (“filling in”): inhalation, an aspect of breath control (pranayama), Purana (“Ancient [History]”): a type of popular encyclopedia dealing with royal genealogy, cosmology, philosophy, and ritual; there are eighteen major and many more minor works of this nature, Purusha (“male”): the transcendental Self (atman) or Spirit, a designation that is mostly used in Samkhya and Patanjali’s yoga-darshana, Radha: the God-man Krishna’s spouse; a name of the divine Mother, Raja-Yoga (“Royal Yoga”): a late medieval designation of Patanjali’s eightfold yoga-darshana, also known as classical yoga, Rama: an incarnation of God Vishnu preceding Krishna; the principal hero of the Ramayana, Ramayana (“Rama’s life”): one of India’s two great national epics telling the story of Rama; cf. Yama is also sometimes called “the five restraints” because it describes what one should avoid to advance on the spiritual path.. The word Sanskrit, in Sanskrit, is spelled Saṁskṛta, and means "refined" or "well made." That’s because like all disciplines, yoga has its own lingo, and yoga’s root language is technically Sanskrit. drishti, Deva (“he who is shining”): a male deity, such as Shiva, Vishnu, or Krishna, either in the sense of the ultimate Reality or a high angelic being, Devi (“she who is shining”): a female deity such as Parvati, Lakshmi, or Radha, either in the sense of the ultimate Reality (in its feminine pole) or a high angelic being, Dharana (“holding”): concentration, the sixth limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, Dharma (“bearer”): a term of numerous meanings; often used in the sense of “law,” “lawfulness,” “virtue,” “righteousness,” “norm”, Dhyana (“ideating”): meditation, the seventh limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, Diksha (“initiation”): the act and condition of induction into the hidden aspects of yoga or a particular lineage of teachers; all traditional yoga is initiatory, Drishti (“view/sight”): yogic gazing, such as at the tip of the nose or the spot between the eyebrows; cf. puraka, recaka, Kundalini-shakti (“coiled power”): according to Tantra and hatha yoga, the serpent power or spiritual energy, which exists in potential form at the lowest psycho-energetic center of the body (i.e., the mula-adhara-cakra) and which must be awakened and guided to the center at the crown (i.e., the sahasrara-cakra) for full enlightenment to occur, Kundalini-Yoga: the yogic path focusing on the kundalini process as a means of liberation, Laya Yoga (“Yoga of dissolution”): an advanced form or process of Tantric yoga by which the energies associated with the various psycho-energetic centers (cakra) of the subtle body are gradually dissolved through the ascent of the serpent power (kundalini-shakti), Linga (“mark”): the phallus as a principle of creativity; a symbol of God Shiva; cf. The spiritual sense of the word yoga first arises in Epic Sanskrit, in the second half of the 1st millennium BCE, and is associated with the philosophical system presented in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, with the chief aim of "uniting" the human spirit with the Divine spirit. The roots, verb-forms, and primary derivatives of the Sanskrit language. “yoga”. ॐ Aum (Om) — God, the sound of the universe. Kriya Yoga is thus “union (yoga) with the Infinite… "It is the origin of the word, yoga, which is a physical, mental and spiritual practice that originated in ancient India and became popular in the West in the 20th century. The Sanskrit word hatha is thought to be derived from the verbal root hath which means "to force" or "hold firmly" and thus Hatha Yoga is sometimes called "forceful yoga. 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